A statue of Esther Morris, who played a major role in making Wyoming the first state to grant voting rights to women, stands in front of the Wyoming State Capitol // (c) 2007 Jimmy Emerson / Flickr

Which was the first state to allow women to vote?

A statue of Esther Morris, who played a major role in making Wyoming the first state to allow women to vote, stands in front of the Wyoming State Capitol // (c) 2007 Jimmy Emerson / Flickr
A statue of Esther Morris, who played a major role in making Wyoming the first state to allow women to vote, stands in front of the Wyoming State Capitol // (c) 2007 Jimmy Emerson / Flickr

The women of Wyoming were the first women in the world granted the full right to vote. In fact, Wyoming earned its state nickname, the Equality State, because women here were the first to vote, the first to serve on juries and the first to hold public office.

Some 20 years before it became a U.S. State, on December 10, 1969, Wyoming Governor A.J. Campbell signed a bill into law granting female suffrage.

More Wyoming Firsts for Women

1870
Ester Hobart Morris became was appointed the first female justice of the peace in South buy levitra online 7 Pass City.

The first all-woman jury served in Laramie.

Mary Atkinson was appointed the first woman bailiff in the world in Albany County.

1894
Estelle Reel became the Wyoming State Superintendent of Public Instruction, making her one of the first women in the U.S. to be elected to a state office.

1924
Nellie Tayloe Ross of Wyoming and “Ma” Ferguson of Texas were the first two women in the United States to be elected as a state Governor. Although they were both elected on the same day, Ross would take office nearly three weeks before Ferguson, making her the first women in the country to hold this position. Ross would go on to hold another first, when she was appointed as the first female director of the U.S. Mint.

More Information
www.cheyenne.org/about-cheyenne/wyoming-info/