Yellowstone National Park // (c) 2009 Michael Privorotsky / Flickr.com
Yellowstone National Park // (c) 2009 Michael Privorotsky / Flickr.com

Which former U.S. President served as a park ranger for the National Park Service?

Yellowstone National Park // (c) 2009 Michael Privorotsky / Flickr.com
In the summer of 1936, Gerald Ford worked as a seasonal park ranger at Yellowstone National Park. // (c) 2009 Michael Privorotsky / Flickr.com

In the summer of 1936, Gerald Ford worked as a seasonal park ranger at Yellowstone National Park.

While serving in Yellowstone, one of Ford’s assignments was as an armed guard on the bear-feeding truck. (Note: the National Park Service no longer feeds the bears.)

During his summer at Yellowstone, Ford also worked in the Canyon Hotel and Lodge meeting and greeting VIPS, and checking the make, model, state and license number of all cars parked in the campgrounds

As President of the United States, President Ford added eighteen new areas to the National Park System, including Canaveral National Seashore (FL), and Valley Forge National Historical Park (PA).

Bear Safety Tips from Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone regulations require visitors to stay 100 yards from black and grizzly bears at all times. The best defense is to stay a safe distance where to buy valtrex from bears and use binoculars, a telescope or telephoto lens to get a closer look. All visitors traveling in the park away from developed areas should stay in groups of three or more, make noise on the trail, keep an eye out for bears and carry bear spray. Bear spray has proven to be a good last line of defense, if kept handy and used according to directions when a bear is approaching within 30 to 60 feet.

While firearms are allowed in the park, the discharge of a firearm is a violation of park regulations. The park’s law enforcement rangers who carry firearms on duty rely on bear spray, rather than their weapons, as the most effective means to deal with a bear encounter.

Visitors are also reminded to keep food, garbage, barbecue grills and other attractants stored in hard-sided vehicles or bear-proof food storage boxes. This helps keep bears from becoming conditioned to human foods, and helps keep park visitors and their property safe.

National Park Service
www.nps.gov

Yellowstone National Park
www.nps.gov/yell