Chalk Mountain from U.S. 50 (AKA The Loneliest Road in America) // (c) 2011 Ken Lund / Flickr.com
Chalk Mountain from U.S. 50 (AKA The Loneliest Road in America) // (c) 2011 Ken Lund / Flickr.com

In 1860, an ad appeared, recruiting for one of the most dangerous jobs in American history, the Pony Express trail rider.

Wanted: Young skinny, wiry fellows not over eighteen. Must be expert riders, willing to risk death daily. Orphans preferred.

Although this certainly isn’t a job we’d ever apply (or even qualify) for, the text certainly caught our attention.

Today, luckily we don’t need to risk life or limb to follow in the footsteps of America’s earliest mailmen.

Chalk Mountain from U.S. 50 (AKA The Loneliest Road in America) // (c) 2011 Ken Lund / Flickr.com
Chalk Mountain from U.S. 50 (AKA The Loneliest Road in America) // (c) 2011 Ken Lund / Flickr.com

Highway 50, dubbed The Loneliest Road in America by Life Magazine, roughly parallels the route of the Pony buy brand name levitra online Express trail. Stretching the width of Nevada (and beyond), this is a scenic and historic corridor through a land largely overlooked by modern-day industry and development.

Sure it’ a lonely road, and okay it doesn’t even have a fancy theme song–no getting your kicks here–but in just a fraction of the time it took the Pony Express riders, roadsters can enjoy  elk watching, high altitude vistas soaring that soar to 11,000 feet, and lonely ghost towns. All without having to worry about attacks from masked bandits or hostile native American tribes.

In Nevada, the route stretches some 400 miles, starting near South Lake Tahoe at the state’ western border, and exiting Nevada to the east through Great Basin National Park. Along the way, travelers will pass through vast desert lands and climb 17 mountain passes, some of which include “steep 8 percent grades and hairpin turns,” according to Wikipedia.com. (Heck, who has time to worry about bandits when there are steep, hairpin turns to navigate.)

Not convinced?

The State of Nevada is providing The Loneliest Road survival kits, which include a road map and guidebook of Highway 50.

And if (ahem, when) you complete the journey? You’ll receive a survival certificate signed by the Governor of Nevada, as well as a bumper sticker announcing that you survived this “uninteresting and empty” road.

Pony Express Territory
www.ponyexpressnevada.com