Guards stand at ticket collection booths at the Beijing train station during Chinese New Year break. // (c) 2012 Liz Phung / Flickr.com
Guards stand at ticket collection booths at the Beijing train station during Chinese New Year break. // (c) 2012 Liz Phung / Flickr.com

In which country does the world’s largest annual human migration occur?

Guards stand at ticket collection booths at the Beijing train station during Chinese New Year break. // (c) 2012 Liz Phung / Flickr.com
Guards stand at ticket collection booths at the Beijing train station during Chinese New Year break. // (c) 2012 Liz Phung / Flickr.com

In China, during the Chinese New Year, which is also known as the Spring Festival, more than 100 million people travel throughout the country–and beyond–to spend the holiday with their loved ones.

In 2014, the Chinese New Year falls on January 31, but the celebrations, which last about 40 days, start two weeks prior to the actual New Year.

The Spring Festival is the most important festival for the Chinese people, and is a challenging time to travel there, with airports, railway stations and long-distance bus stations performing at-capacity. The Spring Festival is calculated according to the lunar buy cheap tramadol calendar, and is often about a month later than the same day on the Gregorian calendar.

The festival itself is a spirited one, with a anticipated series of activities such as lion dancing, dragon lantern dancing, lantern festivals and temple fairs. The Spring Festival culminates in the annual Lantern Festival.

The Lantern Festival usually falls in late February or early March. The tradition dates back to the Han Dynasty (206 BC-AD 220), when an emperor heard that Buddhist monks would watch over the remains from the cremation of Buddha’s body, and they would light lanterns to worship Buddha on that day. The emperor ordered his people to light lanterns in the imperial palace and temples to show respect to Buddha on this day.